Friday, February 26, 2010

Whathaveyou


  • Climbing on the new release express is William Oldham, aka Bonnie "Prince" Billy. His new disc, confidently titled The Wonder Show of the World, will also be attributed to the Cairo Gang. His third album in as many years (fifth if you include a live album and a side project with Brian Harnetty), it'll drop in March.
  • I'd be remiss to overlook Gorillaz, who have a new album coming out in March called Plastic Beach. Really digging the trip-hoppy "Superfast Jellyfish" (hear it on Youtube). Fair warning: The chorus will infect your subconscious.
  • For the first time in a few years, I threw The White Stripes' Get Behind Me Satan into my CD player. Probably the album of theirs I go to the least, but I'm quite enjoying my current revisitation. "Little Ghost" is playful in the same way as "Hotel Yorba". And even though they're pretty much the same song, "The Denial Twist" and "Doorbell" sure are fun.
  • I was engaged in a civil discussion (re: message board throw-down) with some British dude over who was the more bittersweet messenger: the gently-brooding Mark Kozelek or that throaty wankfactory Morrissey. I understand I'm in a scant minority here, but I've always found The Smiths (and Morrissey in particular) to be hyper-maudlin artistes. I'd take Kozelek's unpretentious sincerity any day. Listen to "The Boy With a Thorn In His Side" and compare it to "Drop" by the Red House Painters. I can't imagine thinking the former is a more pure manifestation of sorrow than the latter.
  • Thom Yorke's side project (with Flea on bass) is calling itself Atoms for Peace and will go on a brief major-cities tour in April, wrapping it up at Coachella. After that, he and Radiohead producer Nigel Goodrich (also in the band) had better get their asses back to the studio and wrap up the new Radiohead LP!
  • The Decemberists have written some of my favorite songs of the last decade, perhaps none more so than "Here I Dreamt I Was An Architect" from their debut, Castaways and Cutouts. Despite Colin's complex lyricism, it's a testament to simplicity: The song is basically comprised of two chords. Check it here:

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